Version 4 builds on 2 earlier versions assembled from gathering quotes and Victoria's version 3, that importantly brought the combined frame of our article as both action research experiment and attempt to explain:

"Open Net-Working Organizations - Co-generating Knowledge and Innovation"


EFFECTIVE EXECUTIVE ARTICLE

Fourth Draft Started 2008-04-26 First taken to wiki.


April 24, 2008 REFLECTION JA

In pasting Victoria's version 3, the first to have our article frame gel as both "action research" and "writing about the topic at hand", I thought about changing spaces to work get done. Inspiration was the process of hitting the button to transform this wiki from public to private again. Now only invited people can both view and edit the spaces and I'm wondering:

"Is consciously changing permissions to a virtual space in addition to restructuring the content in the space through naviagtion, an essential tool in NETworking?"

"NETworking" is another thought that emerged reading Victoria's version 3 and paying close attention to Buckman's extraordinary insights so generously shared in his email yesterday, 2004-04-25, (ANZAC Day for this Australian).

Patti Anklam's "Net Work" has influenced me. In the process of working this article we discovered (thanks to John Maloney) ,the Nadir(sp) article that uses both "netWORK" and "intensional". Both powerful. But we've also seen the power of our networks, especially the connection to Jerry Ash that lead us to Robert L. Buckman, designated "the Father Figure " of KM by "Information Week" despite as we learned from Buckman himself via a post to the AOK Yahoo Group that seeded this article, he never set out to manage knowledge.

Hence I'm wondering if it's time to recognize that in the 21st century computer networks can move faster than humans can deal with the flow of information it carries and it's time to focus more on the NET than the "work" to succeed. Hence NETwork?



WORKING VICTORIA'S VERSION 3

Open Net-Working Organizations - Co-generating Knowledge and Innovation

"In a March 2007 "Long Live KM" online discussion through the AOK Group, Robert Buckman, founder Buckman Laboratories (described by Infoworld as "KM's father figure ") wrote:
"Jerry, thank you for the kind words, but I never did try and manage knowledge. What I really tried to manage and nurture was a culture that would encourage and expand the flow of knowledge. It was because economic value could only be obtained in our environment when knowledge moved across the organization in response to a need."
~ Bob Buckman, March 6, 2007 AOK Yahoo Group Post


Two decades since Buckman's pioneering work to encourage and expand knowledge flow and innovation, creating an open culture is still “the key element” he tells us.

In writing this article we wanted to explore what thoughts and experiences our extended network had on open networks for co-generating knowledge, how today’s fast paced technology enabled, interconnected business environment makes a difference and what has changed since Buckman’s process of knowledge sharing set the high standard. We have the good fortune of many talented people in addition to Bob Buckman’s to draw upon for insight.
Practicing what we preach – action research, our process started with an initial post to our blog describing the first article premise, a network view of organizations. We reached out to trusted colleagues with deep knowledge on the topic, connecting to others either on the edge or not in our network, other blogs, email, Facebook and phone. What resulted was an extraordinary treasure trove of real world experience and validated our second article thesis that value is created through relationships, sharing and knowledge flow – co-generation.

Sifting through the collected wisdom
10 CRITICAL DIMENSIONS emerged as essential to shifting thinking, language and action in business now operating today interconnected globally and locally, at computer networked speed. While in each domain there is information and as many questions, drawing as they do from the experience of companies large and small from IBM and Boeing through Qualcomm and the Bordeaux Colloquium, and networks from the European Union to individual Facebook Groups, each offers insight into the new ways of thinking and acting required. Each points to how succeeding today demands thinking beyond a solely transactional, process oriented, linear view of organizations (ingrained from years of standard business school models and management practices), to one that embodies networks, complexity models, and demands non-linear thinking. Critical is learning to operate AND BOTH, of appropriately choreographing control and opennes, facilitating interactions, and participations of employees with partners, suppliers, and essential external expertise networks to enable a continuing flow of essential knowledge and fresh ideas essemtial to sustainable economic value creation.



CALL TO ACTION

We understand the challenge netWORKing provides but contend both individuals and organizations must adopt "AND BOTH" thinking and operating. While core functions will continute to rely on familiar, maximally efficient linear processes capability-- intellectual, organizational, and technology-- must be added to tap and leverage the value creating potential of extended human networks, what we call "NETworking".

Consciously operating organizations as interconnected human networks, provides significant challenges to traditional organizations, not the least of which is transformed thinking that begins with understanding how value is created through interactions, sharing and being open to ensure knowledge flows and innovation occurs at the pace sustaining a 21st century business demands . To promote innovation and increase value creation organizations must adopt a new approach to their employees, recognizing that each has power through their personal networks to make increasignly significant contributions through their connectedness.

Human history from Socratic dialogues through Senge's book ( ) have proved the power and importance of conversation and challenging dialogues to refine thinking and emerge new ideas. Our experience reaching out to our networks, the rich conversations and idea flow that resulted reminded us of that power. At the same time we realized again how important taking time to listen carefully, reflect on what is truly being said, further conversations with existing participants and engage new contributors for understanding and synthesis. In a world of overflowing information and ideas in closing we encourage all individual readers and their organizations to build time for listening and reflecting for understanding into the day-to-day before giving Robert L. Buckman who inspired this article the closing word:

----

NOTES FROM VA JA CALL AT 12.30PM
Victoria.. Senge Bill Isaac.. dialogue of groups... there's a stream of conversation.. leaves grabbed from the flow.. process to suspend assumpitons and clearly listen to what people are saying.. Importance of taking TIME and LISTENING and REFLECTION. Importance of CONTEXT Example: Strategy & Business supply chain analysis. Ease with which something can be distorted. No time to read.
People who haven't spoken but hearing similar train of thoughts.. People through their experience come to same conclusions about what is good through similar circumstances. Hear and see a commonality.

Supports if you go out to diverse areas can get either views or might be able to get information to corooborates thinking or uncover something one hasn't thought about at all. Themes bubbled up. Then cross check. Ship conversation to somebody else.



.

VICTORIA HELP PLEASE—INTRODUCE THE GRAPHIC…..
To embody the importance of adopting new visual language we’re using netWORK and intensional and putting them, netWORK is to focus attention on the importance of seeing networks as resources to be leveraged and put to work to create value. And intensional to focus on the fact that the essence of value creation comes through interactions based on tension..
Here are the elements to consider. To be an effective executive contributing to creating a culture in your organization that encourages knowledge flow to create economic value as Robert L. Buckman intended here are 10 dimensions to understand.

1. Organizations function as complex networks or webs. JENNY

Ecosystem of Networks which is our graphic - most macro view and the context in which the business operates What is the business about what is the purpose in the marketplace? fits with Drucker, maybe one notch higher view. We introduce network mindset, language shift and later new metrics/measuure.
Thought, language, action. (aka - the fundamentals of learning and change)

VA: Introduce The Ecosystem of Networks (fig 1) and describe. Network radiating out from the core to the periphery, the marketplace. Internal to the organization is the formal structure that people are most familiar with, the backbone, like the road system. But the work gets done through the network of relationships and interactions that takes place in the informal. The organization can control it’s operating structures (financial structures,

Ultimate marketplace customers, suppliers, partners, regulatory bodies, and macro-economic conditions with exchanges going back and forth.

Insert lessons from IBM, a classic example of an organization facing a rapidly changing world. Gerstner recognizing the shift to a knowledge economy and reframing to service.

…. Insert ….p 15 ..

Transition began going to the edge of organization to innovative employees the web. With John Patrick representing in the executive suite, IBM transtioned to eBusiness… Built on that engaging employees through JAMS to reinventing culture and proceeded to extend collaboration as pioneers in employees share knowledge beyond the core with customers and partners through blogs and wiki
Insert Mike Wing words

And now today it’s an organizations that understands knowledge created through sharing an is advocating changes need to the patent system..

Insert See Manckiewitz quote..

IBM exemplifies the ecosystem of networks…

Insert fig2 Language shift -


2. Work gets done through individual networks VICTORIA

More importantly, an intensional (source) open netWORKing approach aids understanding how "network capital value" is created in organizations through dynamic interactions and relationships between all of an organization's participants and stakeholders.

Seque using the IBM case.. transition sentence,, as in IBM where we saw X,000 blogs
(see 2005 Wing presentation)


Networks can be defined as the source of labor..

From Karen Nadir paper?

Plus a story.. an example…

Mention DIVERSITY




3. Knowledge is created through individual interactions Jenny

McKinsey argument..

Power Law of Participaton—graphic


Buckman quote

"Power is being given to the individual"

Whenever you expand an individual's Span of Communication you also expand their potential Span of Influence and their power. The individual communication device that we call the computer and the Internet have forever changed the power that the individual has today. At this time individuals are just learning how to exercise that power. As they do, they will redefine how commerce takes place as one example(ordering goods and services over the Internet rather than shopping in a store). We are just seeing the beginning of the change that this shift (vga emphasis – this is a great term from science) in power to the individual will cause in commerce, organizations, governments, etc.



4. Patterns of participation impact knowledge flows. Jenny


Change patterns of participation (interaction) to change where knowledge flows.

John Seely Brown & Estee


5. ONA reveals current knowledge flows and individual's roles Victoria

ONA is a diagnostic tool, to be used with other data. From ego nets to org level nets Dependent on questions asked, interpretation. Interventions

By taking and using the tools of Organizational Network Analysis (ONA) we can make knowledge flows and individual’s relationships to networks visible . However, creating an open, collaborative, knowledge sharing organizational culture requires a supporting value system.



ONA is an analytic process for revealing participation patterns. Might want to reference the highest level of participation is contribution.

Description of ONA from the Workshop materials

Insert Doris & Robin

While the discipline of organizational network analysis has significantly evolved since, (as pioneering ONA practitioner Valdis Krebs advises) IBM's Jerry Falkowski so named it at IBM in the early 90's because "social network analysis" did not resonate with executives. Still while network maps provide invaluable insight into how work gets done in organizations, further investigation (such as follow up interviews with participants as IBM's Kate Ehrlich conducts) are necessary to get inside the human dynamics.

Jenny, I do not claim to be an expert on "organizational network analysis". However, if the objective is to achieve a snapshot of how the organization is functioning at the moment and who the key players are, then organizational network analysis has some merit. But I do not think it has much to building the culture of work for the future. What I am talking about is how you change what the organizational network is currently to something very different in the future. I am more interested in a new organizational model based on trust that achieves speed of response radically faster that it can currently. For example: Think about how you shift the average speed of response of the organization toward instantaneity relative to the needs of its customers. That is how you can achieve a competitive advantage.


6. Network maps visualize network analysis Victoria
Network patterns are revealed for shared understanding of current state. Action can be taken to change patterns.

Insert Doris & Robin

7. Network Analysis provides new measurement tools and value measures. Jenny

Delivers new suite of tools for measuring performance

Patti quote.. density

Rob Cross article .. in organizations

Gulati.. network resources

VA: (Need to sort through these.) VNA maps (intangibles - really "soft skills, observable behaviors or social skills. Would avoid use of "perceptions" stick with observable behavior.. AND tangibles - technical deliverables - what are called work products)

Relational abilities of high performers has been parsed and through controlled experiments has been taught. Raytheon ided a group of HIPOs who were on track for top positions so there would be no disadvantage if they did not receive "network training" Those who received the training <><>succeeded faster, out performed cohort group.

Others?

8. Knowledge is in netWorking. Innovation is the result of action. Victoria

Qualcomm case—from emails captured in WORD DOC

IBM and GE complexity of service value networks, include notion that even traditional manufacturing companies derive x % of business from service…GE straddles both IBM prefers to move into all service. The service value network does not have the same
There are many reasons for the growth of the services sector: increasing competition in a global economy, pressure to innovate, and changing customer demands and expectations have led traditionally products-based companies and manufacturing leaders to focus on services in “defense against commoditization of goods and a strategy for productivity, growth and retention.”3


Capture and retrieval is a whole other story and to me it is the Boeing gal. It is complex, tough and unforgiving to get it right.

Emphasis on the network space, the edge of the network, the diversity, the opportunities, wisdom of the crowd in certain cases individual and their network in others - stuff from previous articles.

Knowledge lives in the network where it is created.

9. Technologies shape work Jenny
To change knowledge flow choose technology that enables the flow you seek. Good place to put in the Stowe Boyd and McAfee evidence. The generational impact - we have timeline of <><>technology as context from early presentations. Lift from Chris note.. not just one tool.. the space between the tools

(Simon Wardley)
Think about how you shift the average speed of response of the organization toward instantaneity relative to the needs of its customers. That is how you can achieve a competitive advantage. Buckman
Blogs, wikis, collaboration platforms offer the speed of ”instantaneity” relative to the needs of the customer “if we get out of the way of individuals using them” according to Euan Semple, former BBC-------.

Enable s the speed that Buckman is looking for which is the competitive advantage
If you look at it from the standpoint of how much effort it takes to achieve effect knowledge sharing across an organization, you will find that the technology piece is about 5 to 10 percent of the effort, changing the way work is done is the 90 to 95 percent of the effort. Buckman


10. Balance Intension and Control VICTORIA

Culture <><>underpins all of the above - back to Buckman, the end is the beginning, The values, beliefs, norms which are modeled and enacted daily in all aspects of work. openness, support sharing and ACTING. These are all values. What do the behaviors look like to support these values? What is action in your firm - spell it out , get others to agree.
Policies are an artifact of culture as are incentives, rewards, acknowledgements, etc. etc. Motivation ah. I can not motivate (force) I can only create the conditions for individual motivation to be expressed. Maybe competition, need to understand the individual drivers.

"economic value could only be obtained in our environment when knowledge moved across the organization in response to a need."

Yes, culture is still the key element if you want the knowledge in the organization to flow in response to a need some where else in the organization. If you look at it from the standpoint of how much effort it takes to achieve effect knowledge sharing across an organization, you will find that the technology piece is about 5 to 10 percent of the effort, changing the way work is done is the 90 to 95 percent of the effort. You can define the effort as time or as money, it still comes out about the same. Some of the elements in this culture piece are:
1. Redefining the time equation of work by doing things differently. If you do not redefine the time equation of the individual relative to his work, then they will not be interested in participating in what you are proposing. This is because everybody is time compressed.

2. Knowledge will not flow unless there is trust between the parties that the knowledge will be used in an appropriate manner. And, that the knowledge given will not be accepted unless there is trust that it is the best that can be given at that moment.

3. Trust is built on the fundamental values of the organization. What the people believe is important for them to trust communication with people that they have never met. Think about how you determine the fundamental values of the organization. And, how you make those fundamental values on which trust is built the bedrock of the organization. That is what we did when we determined the values that make up our Code of Ethics. (Attached)


2. If so, has anything changed in your thinking about how best to develop this culture and if so, what?

Not really. As I mentioned it starts with the fundamental values of the organization. Those values are the resultant of all the values of the individuals that are involved in the organization. An easy way to determine what is important in any organization is to as the people what is important to them to have effective communication and collaboration across time and space with people that they have never met. All of our people participated in such a process in our organization. We took what each group came up with and combined them in rank order. Then we sent the master list back to determine the precious few. Our Code of Ethics was the resultant.

By the way, Dave Snowden has indicated that he feels that this is the primary reason that we have achieved the success we have in Knowledge Sharing across the organization.


Tension from change in locus of control through enhanced power to convene.
E.G Avedas

As use of open technologies increases there is proportional decrease in control. Slide here. Financial controls, compliance, regulations external factors or firm constraints need to be acknowledged.

TENSION (Doris) is needed for FLOW in networks so you must create the conditions that support flow: Motivation and Incentives



Do you still see that it is the organizational culture that is key to encouraging and expanding the flow of knowledge because:
"economic value could only be obtained in our environment when knowledge moved across the organization in response to a need."

Yes, culture is still the key element if you want the knowledge in the organization to flow in response to a need some where else in the organization. If you look at it from the standpoint of how much effort it takes to achieve effect knowledge sharing across an organization, you will find that the technology piece is about 5 to 10 percent of the effort, changing the way work is done is the 90 to 95 percent of the effort. You can define the effort as time or as money, it still comes out about the same. Some of the elements in this culture piece are:
1. Redefining the time equation of work by doing things differently. If you do not redefine the time equation of the individual relative to his work, then they will not be interested in participating in what you are proposing. This is because everybody is time compressed.

2. Knowledge will not flow unless there is trust between the parties that the knowledge will be used in an appropriate manner. And, that the knowledge given will not be accepted unless there is trust that it is the best that can be given at that moment.

3. Trust is built on the fundamental values of the organization. What the people believe is important for them to trust communication with people that they have never met. Think about how you determine the fundamental values of the organization. And, how you make those fundamental values on which trust is built the bedrock of the organization. That is what we did when we determined the values that make up our Code of Ethics. (Attached)


2. If so, has anything changed in your thinking about how best to develop this culture and if so, what?

Not really. As I mentioned it starts with the fundamental values of the organization. Those values are the resultant of all the values of the individuals that are involved in the organization. An easy way to determine what is important in any organization is to as the people what is important to them to have effective communication and collaboration across time and space with people that they have never met. All of our people participated in such a process in our organization. We took what each group came up with and combined them in rank order. Then we sent the master list back to determine the precious few. Our Code of Ethics was the resultant.

By the way, Dave Snowden has indicated that he feels that this is the primary reason that we have achieved the success we have in Knowledge Sharing across the organization.

3. Our article topic is:
Open Net-Working Organizations - Co-generating Knowledge and Innovation
From your perspective is our focus on understanding organizations as networks and using the growing discipline of "organizational network analysis" helpful to building a culture that supports knowledge flow in organizations?

Jenny, I do not claim to be an expert on "organizational network analysis". However, if the objective is to achieve a snapshot of how the organization is functioning at the moment and who the key players are, then organizational network analysis has some merit. But I do not think it has much to building the culture of work for the future. What I am talking about is how you change what the organizational network is currently to something very different in the future. I am more interested in a new organizational model based on trust that achieves speed of response radically faster that it can currently. For example: Think about how you shift the average speed of response of the organization toward instantaneity relative to the needs of its customers. That is how you can achieve a competitive advantage.


4. Given that Information Week recognizes you as KM's father figure" although that's not what you set out to do, what can you say about KM today, especially in the context of a special KM edition of a magazine for "executives" aspiring to be "effective"? For example, in the context of the theme of our article, putting networks to work, does it help to talk about knowledge "facilitation' rather than knowledge "management"?

I have always felt that Knowledge Management was the wrong term to describe what we were trying to do. In fact, I tried to use it in our organization and met an immediate resistance to our efforts from our people. After testing the term for a couple of weeks, we finally realized where the resistance was coming from. It was coming from the perception that we were trying to manage the knowledge that was in peoples heads. So, we changed to using Knowledge Sharing to describe what we wanted to accomplish and the rest is history. Facilitating the movement of knowledge in an organization is a valid approach.

5. Finally, I promise. I noted your 2006 Inside Knowledge Magazine article "Buckman Looks to India and China" .In light of our writing for an Indian publication and your suggestion that:
“Look at what is happening in China and India. The leaders there are transforming their countries. Power is being given to the individual and the people that never had it before through technology,” said Buckman.
do you have any closing, forward looking thoughts, please? For example:

i. I'm intrigued by how organizations choreograph technology and organizational structures to maximize business opportunities and value creation. Is that relevant here?

What is relevant is how fast can you change your organization around the needs of the customer. Speed in this area will determine who will win and who will not.

ii. Could you please elaborate on your thinking behind the importance of:

"Power is being given to the individual"

Whenever you expand an individual's Span of Communication you also expand their potential Span of Influence and their power. The individual communication device that we call the computer and the Internet have forever changed the power that the individual has today. At this time individuals are just learning how to exercise that power. As they do, they will redefine how commerce takes place as one example(ordering goods and services over the Internet rather than shopping in a store). We are just seeing the beginning of the change that this shift in power to the individual will cause in commerce, organizations, governments, etc.

iii. Are you still looking to China and India, or has some other development caught your attention?

China and India are good examples of what is happening. Brazil is another country that is experiencing rapid change at this time. Look for those countries that have a very entrepreneurial approach to society and you will find those that will change the future. And, they will do it very fast.

Let me know if you have any more questions.

All the best. BOB


TO BE AN EFFECTIVE EXECUTIVE IN A NETWORKED WORLD

End giving them a new frame for KM without mentioning.. facilitating knowledge flow and value creation in open organizatioins using networks /

Nod to Jerry… Stunning example of boots on ground undertaking in a highly technical, manufacturing Boeing story.. what it takes to keep that knowledge alive.. from the Masters to the Padawans…. Generational shift…

Focus on KNOWLEDGE CREATION… retrieval another story..

Boeing is more visible at time of writing for supply chain failure. Instrumental in looking at a failure is lessons learned… and also the culture.. that included we already for Boeing according Deep Stall author excessive focus on shareholder v strategic value..



New book examines Boeing's decline

Issue date: 12/09/2005
Issue date: 12/09/05
http://info.uwe.ac.uk/news/uwenews/article.asp?item=694
Deep Stall: The Turbulent Story of Boeing Commercial Airplanes
The book uses the concept of strategic value to explain Boeing's decline. Strategic value is created via a company's investment in people and technology to enable future market success by developing innovative new products. The authors argue that Boeing has neglected strategic value in favour of shareholder value, defined in terms of short-term cash benefits.

"Effective Executive" was the name of a Peter Drucker book


The end is the beginning (culture) if we use the Buckman quote as the kick off. These are evergreen fundamentals of efffectiveness, they transcend size, scope, f2f or cyberspace.
eight practices:
• They asked, "What needs to be done?"
• They asked, "What is right for the enterprise?"
• They developed action plans.
• They took responsibility for decisions.
- They took responsibility for communicating.
• They were focused on opportunities rather than
problems.
• They ran productive meetings.
• They thought and said "we" rather than "I."
The first two practices gave them the knowledge they
needed. The next four helped them convert this knowledge
into effective action. The last two ensured that the
whole organization felt responsible and accountable.


Stood the test of time for 40 years but as gotten more networked need to be more collaborative.
Best case what’s need to be done to a large and diverse group and engages the conversation.
Shift is engaging more people deeper in the organization and beyond … bring the customer.
IBM… Shifted is who I am asking this question of.. And for inspiration look no further than British scientist Tim Berners-Lee -- the man credited with inventing the Web. Berners-Lee had come over to the U.S. from CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory in Switzerland where the Web had first launched three years earlier. Peter Gloor, then a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Boston 15 years ago at the same time and reports "I had the benefit of watching him work close up for a few months, and I saw that his real genius lay in his ability to co-ordinate and incorporate the ideas of all these hundreds of other people based around the world"
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/04/03/collaboration.spirit/#cnnSTCText

(Responsibility for decisions… buck has to stop somewhere.. someone has to own..)
It’s a collaborative networked world that doesn’t mean taking responsibility and having the will to innovate. Things don’t emerge unless people are taking responsibility, acting and contributing.

Gloor was as a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Boston 15 years ago at the same time as British scientist Tim Berners-Lee -- the man credited with inventing the Web.
Berners-Lee had come over to the U.S. from CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory in Switzerland where the Web had first launched three years earlier.
"I had the benefit of watching him work close up for a few months, and I saw that his real genius lay in his ability to co-ordinate and incorporate the ideas of all these hundreds of other people based around the world"
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/04/03/collaboration.spirit/#cnnSTCText
NOTE: Insert observation about Knowledge Management in a networked 21st century world.



FGIBI
"The authors knew from conducting a Facebook Groups in Business Investigation about the complexity of understanding what drives activity in an online social network and how you explain the factors in changing participation and growth rates. Our Facebook experience was confirmed by FAS Research's Doris Spielthenner who conducts sophisticated networkanalyses in applications ranging from will pop a gem in here investigating organizations to understanding the dynamics of regional economic development for the European Union."
INSERT QUOTE
While the discipline of organizational network analysis has significantly evolved since, (as pioneering ONA practitioner Valdis Krebs advises) IBM's Jerry Falkowski so named it at IBM in the early 90's because "social network analysis" did not resonate with executives. Still while network maps provide invaluable insight into how work gets done in organizations, further investigation (such as follow up interviews with participants as IBM's Kate Ehrlich conducts) are necessary to get inside the human dynamics.









VOCABULARY Sidebar
Insert


CHECK LIST PEOPLE WE WANT TO CITE
Robin Teigland
Doris from FAST
Laurence Lock Lee
Stowe Boyd
Buckman
Simon Wardley
Nick Barker
Ricardo dos Santos
IBM’ERS ,,, Mike Wiing & colleague
Rob Cross


SCRIBBLINGS- TO ENSURE ARE INCLUDED- ROUGH NOTES
KEY CONCEPTS

FROM IBM-- technology, policy and culture of open platforms and standards"

"We Build Our Tools And They Shape Us” ~ Stowe

Flow you need tools to support…
Explore the platforms that Boeing uses in the Supply Chain?


Need measures that guide business in a networked world

Visualization

Organization not just the four walls- it’s dynamic (assembling around work) and flows from Individuals. Mobile and increasingly in virtual worlds

Unstructuring???

Open

:


CASE EXAMPLES

While we will revisit open working models investigated in our Inside Knowledge articles:
· Qualcomm's Venture Fest using prediction markets
· The Bordeaux Energy Colloquium, a Think Tank Network,
· Executive to Executive Marketing Networks as implemented at Avaya
· Procter and Gamble's "Connect and Develop" and innovation marketplaces like Innocentive
we're also exploring approaches including:
· Boston Consulting Group's use of mapping tools to understand networks around patents and identify high potential talent. (Did they really just use Touchgraph as Manuel Lima suggests commenting on the Business Week article?)
· IBM's use of open network initiatives including sharing research with partners and clients. (Thanks to John Maloney for this paper find.)
The innnovative and business critical collaborative knowledge sharing initiatives presented at the Enterprise 2.0 Summit, Hanover.
BOEING
In writing about open network approaches we're alert to investigating when such models appear not to work effectively. Hence we're striving to understand what caused Boeing's decentralized 787 supply chain to become a critical factor in the company's high profile and costly aircraft delivery delays.